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TOP 20 Books British People Lie about Having Read. Part Two: 11 to 20.

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Hello and welcome to a presentation of the
Top Twenty Books British People Lie about Having Read.
In part one I covered books 1 to 10 which you can see in the Info cards above.
In this video I will cover Books 11 to 20 that British people pretend to have read.
More than half of British people (56%) pretend to have read a book, a nationwide study has
revealed according to research commissioned to mark the live broadcast on Sky Arts of
The Times and Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival.
As for why they pretend to read certain books, 37% claimed they simply wanted to join in
a conversation, while 31% said they did so to seem more intelligent and 17% were trying
to impress a date. Number 11.
5% lied about having read A Brief History of Time by Steven Hawking.
Hawking wrote: ‘The universe doesn’t allow perfection.’
Number 12. 5% also lied about having read Crime and Punishment
by Fyodor Dostoevsky. For those who want to appear more intelligent
than they are, Dostoevsky wrote: ‘It takes something more than intelligence to act intelligently.’
And ‘The fear of appearances is the first symptom of impotence.’
He also wrote: ‘The most offensive is not their lying—one can always forgive lying—lying
is a delightful thing, for it leads to truth—what is offensive is that they lie and worship
their own lying.’ Number 13.
5% also lied about having read The Odyssey by Homer.
Homer Wrote: ‘Urge him with truth to frame his fair replies;
And sure he will; for wisdom never lies.’ And:
‘Words empty as the wind are best left unsaid.’ Number 14.
4% lied about having read The Old Man and The Sea by Ernest Hemingway.
Still trying to impress that date? Hemingway wrote:
‘A cat has absolute emotional honesty: human beings, for one reason or another, may hide
their feelings, but a cat does not.’ Number 15.
4% also lied about having read Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov.
Nabokov wrote: ‘The good reader is one who has imagination,
memory, a dictionary, and some artistic sense.’ Number 16.
4% also lied about having read Ulysses by James Joyce.
Joyce wrote: ‘Life is too short to read a bad book.’
He also wrote: ‘I fear those big words, Stephen said, which
make us so unhappy.’ and
‘Have read little and understood less.’ Number 17.
3% lied about having read The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell.
Gladwell wrote: ‘We have, as human beings, a storytelling
problem. We’re a bit too quick to come up with explanations for things we don’t really
have an explanation for.’ Number 18.
3% also lied about having read Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari.
Harari wrote: ‘Does happiness really depend on self-delusion?’
And: ‘Telling effective stories is not easy.
The difficulty lies not in telling the story, but in convincing everyone else to believe
it.’ Number 19.
3% also lied about having read The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath.
Plath wrote: ‘It never occurred to me to say no.’
Number 20. 2% lied about having read The Fountainhead
by Ayn Rand. For those who lied because they simply wanted
to join in a conversation, Ayn Rand wrote: ‘Men have been taught that it is a virtue
to agree with others. But the creator is the man who disagrees. Men have been taught that
it is a virtue to swim with the current. But the creator is the man who goes against the
current. Men have been taught that it is a virtue to stand together. But the creator
is the man who stands alone.’ And now here is a quick recap and I’ll be
back soon with another BookTube Video.

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7 thoughts on “TOP 20 Books British People Lie about Having Read. Part Two: 11 to 20.”

  1. Bookish says:

    There are some strange books at the end of this list.

  2. Hannah's Books says:

    Really? People lie about reading Rand? In my circle in the US, people might be inclined to lie if they HAVE read Rand—or at least to explain why they read it. And I read The Tipping Point and wished I had skipped it and in fact might lie and say I didn’t read it just to avoid convwrs. I watched the Sapiens Coursera videos and enjoyed their quirkiness—but again, it seems like a strange one to lie about! You English! 😉🤓

  3. Meghan Hanet says:

    Loved this second part. I haven't read any of these! 😆

  4. Janet Campbell says:

    I've only read The Bell Jar and Crime and Punishment. The latter I read quite recently and it went straight to the top of my all time favourites list. I mean to read The Odyssey sometime.

  5. Mary Tumulty says:

    This is a quirky collection of fiction and non-fiction titles. The nerd in me is curious as to how the survey questions were framed. Oddly, the fiction titles are definitely back list while the non-fiction Sapiens and The Tipping Point are 21st C.
    I read 3 3/4 of the fiction titles. The Fountain Head was due back at the library before I finished it. Due to school assignments, I never went back to finish it.

  6. The Joy of Reading says:

    Ok, I have read 7 of them… but it's true ☺

  7. Wilde for Classics says:

    I read 9/10 books from the last list but only 3 from this one, though there are no more in the second bunch I'm interested in reading. This second grouping seems more random.

    Interesting…thank you!

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